Wednesday, 26 August 2020

HELP FOR ANDREW. CAN ANYONE IDENTIFY THE DEPTFORD LOCATION IN THIS PHOTO PLEASE.

 Hi,


This is a photo of my maternal grandfather, Douglas Jack Green, taking part in a parade somewhere in Deptford! My grandparents lived in Evelyn Street until about 1933, when they moved to Sidcup.

My grandfather is the scout on the far left of the front row playing - we think - an euphonium. I know he was very involved with the scout movement.

My grandmother’s full name was Ivy Gladys May Green, nee Kingston. I think she worked at the Fry’s Chocolate factory nearby.

Andrew Stephen



Monday, 13 July 2020

Help for Kellie

Hi there,

Im not sure if anyone will be able to help me but I stumbled on this blog about the history of Deptford.  My grandmother was born in 1908 and her family came from Deptford. She was born there and at some point came to Australia with her father and the woman she believed was her mother.  Unbeknownst to her her real mother was back in Deptford with her brother and went on to have a family with a new husband later on.  Its a long twisted tale Im not sure how it all went down, but would love to know if you have any information on any McAlister/Turner or Lee family from the Deptford area.  I am in Australia and dont know much about Deptford itself.

Many thanks

Kellie

Letter from John C. Buckley, 57 Florence Road, New Cross, Deptford, [England], to William Lloyd Garrison, July 3, [18]67

Hi,

I live on Florence Road (historically in Deptford New Town) and have been trying to find out about the history of our short street and am waiting to hear back from the council's local studies team. 

You may already have this, but I did find a letter which was written in 57 Florence Road in 1867 by an American soldier called John C. Buckley to abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison who was coming to England which I've attached here. 

I wanted to get in touch to check if any readers know anything about Florence Road and its history at all? A quick search returned no results but I thought I'd try my luck and contact you as well!
Thank you so much, Liz







Wednesday, 1 July 2020

FOUL PLAY AT 17 WATERGATE STREET DEPTFORD

GEORGE LEADBEATER (38) , Feloniously wounding Emily Lewis with intent to murder her. Second Count, with intent to do her grievous bodily harm.

MR. GRAHAM CAMPBELL Prosecuted.
EMILY LEWIS . I live at 17, Watergate St, Deptford—I am single and a laundress—I have known the prisoner between four and five years by living with him as his wife—I ceased to live with him the week before Whitsun on account of his brutality to me he turned me out—I went to live at Mrs. Cromartie's, No. 2, Riley Street and from there to 17, Water-gate Street—I saw the prisoner on October 18th at about a quarter to six; he asked me if I should like to go to a play—we went to the Star Music Hall,



The Star Music Hall, Bermondsey.
and from there to Peckham; we went to a public house and had two glasses of ale; he threw one over me, and I walked out and took the tram to Deptford—I went home and came out again—I met the prisoner in Watergate Street—he drew out an open knife and said, "You and me for it before twelve o'clock to-night"—that is the knife (Produced)—I said, "Before you do that think of your boys down home; never mind me, go and see to them"—he quietened down, and I asked him for a halfpenny, which he gave me—I went to the Harp of Erin 


Harp of Erin
and got a glass of ale—he came in and landed me a blow on the face—he accused me of being with Mr. Cromartie—we were turned out of the public house—it was 11.30—Mr. Cromartie saw me home—I shut myself in the back room—three minutes later the prisoner came in; he had no boots on and a lightedmatch in one hand and the open knife in the other—he said he meant doing for me and stabbed me on my forehead three times—I tried to protect myself and got a stab in my neck and the back of my ear—I fell down on my left side—I said, "Oh, George, you have killed me, get me a drop of brandy;" he said, "My girl, I will," and jumped out at the window for it—I crawled upstairs to Mrs. Iiford's room—when he brought the brandy he had a cut on his hand—I was taken to Princes Street Police Station

Prince St Police Station
and from there to the infirmary—I remained there till last Tuesday.
The Prisoner. I had been out drinking with my brother-in-law; I was drunk; all I know is we went out for a walk; I do not know anything about beer being thrown over her; after we went to Peckham I do not know what happened; I did not recollect anything till Sunday morning.
By the COURT. The prisoner unloads bricks from barges—there is not a quieter man when he is sober.
JOHN THOMAS KIDDES . I am landlord of the Harp of Erin, King Street , Deptford—Emily Lewis was in my house on Saturday, October 18th about 11 p.m.—she had a glass of ale—the prisoner rushed into the bar and started using bad language, so I had him put out—he was perfectly sober—he called her filthy names and said she had been deceiving him.
The Prisoner. If he says I was sober he is telling a falsehood; I do not even recollect seeing him.
JOHN WILLIAM AMOS . I am a labourer of 17, Watergate Street Deptford—at 11.20 on October 18th I saw the prisoner in my back room—I asked him what business he had there; he said, "All right, Jack"—he came out at the door with a lighted match—he had a knife in his hand or a dagger—he shut it up and put it in his pocket—he rushed out of the passage—that made me suspicious, and I burst open the door of the back room—I saw Emily Lewis, who was a stranger to me, lying face downwards in a pool of blood—I went for help, and when I came back she had crawled upstairs under my adopted son's bed—Mrs. Cromartie and myself found her there, and put her on the door-step till the constable took her.
By the COURT. I know the prisoner by sight—I have seen him in the place three or four times—I believe he is some relation of Mr. Cromartie, but what I cannot say—I believe he was the worse for liquor, but I cannot say he was drunk.
EMMA CROMARTIE . I am the wife of George Cromartie, of 17, Watergate  Street, Deptford—at the end of August, Emily Lewis came to live at my house—on October 18th, at about 11.45, I found her in the back room and brought her down into my room—I saw the prisoner there; he brought a cup with some brandy or whisky in it—I took it out of his hand and said, "Leave my room, you brute"—he went away, and I did not see him any more until he was at Princess Street Station—I helped the constable lead Emily Lewis to the station, where her wounds were stitched up.
WILLIAM WIGGINS . I am assistant medical superintendent of Greenwich Infirmary


GREENWICH Infirmary 
Emily Lewis was brought to me on October 19th, at 2.30 a.m.; she was very faint from loss of blood—I found a wound 2 1/2 inches long over her right eye, and eight punctured wounds in her neck, chiefly in the back—they varied in depth from 1 inch to 2 1/2 inches; one of them reachedas far as the spinal column; the wound over her eye reached down to the scalp—there was a cut on her left arm and left hand, a contusion over her left eye and a cut on her lip—the wounds were such as might be caused by the knife produced—she remained at the infirmary till November 4th—dodo of the wounds of themselves would be fatal, but they were dangerous if either of the wounds in the neck had severed the jugular vein or one of the main arteries she would have lived but a few minutes—the position of the wounds was dangerous.
FRANK BEVIS (Police Sergeant R.) On October 19th, at 1 a.m., I saw the prisoner at 29, Charles Street (now Comet PlaceI said, "I am a police sergeant and shall arrest you for attempting to murder by stabbing Emily Lewis on head, neck, and arms at 17, Watergate Street at ten o'clock to-night"—he said, "I caught her with George Cromartie; I meant her murder; I wish the knife was longer so that it would have put her out; I wish I had the chance to do it now"—I produced the knife, and he said, "That is the knife I did it with"—I took him to the station—he was afterwards charged, when he said, "Very good, this is what a man will do when he is mad wild"—on being taken from the dock he said, "I meant to kill Cromartie as well"—when I arrested him he appeared to be perfectly sober.
Prisoner's defence. "I did not understand the charge when it was read over to me. I did not recollect anything that night. I plead for mercy. I do not know what I did it for. I had no cause for it.
GUILTY on the Second Count only. Three years' penal servitude.

Report from the Old Bailey Records

Saturday, 27 June 2020

St Nicholas Church Deptford 1966.


Original new photograph sent to me by an interested subscriber.

Deptford Water Works Chimney Demolition 1966


I was sent this old photo showing Deptford Waterworks chimney demolition. Can anyone tell me what location the photo was taken from. Thanks.











Rank Flower Mill 1966.







Mumford’s Flour Mills were founded in 1790, built beside Deptford Creek. The mills were supplied by small craft entering the Creek from the Thames. Mumford’s Mills flourished throughout the 19th century. It should be noted that 11 Mills were recorded in the Domesday Book (1086), all standing on the River Ravensbourne. Because Mumford’s Mill was not erected until 1790, it is not one of those 11 ancient mills. A new large mill was erected 1897, designed by Sir Aston Webb and Ingress Bell. There are large inscriptions at the top of the building showing ‘1790, 1897, Mumford’s Greenwich Flour Mills’ and ’S P Mumford & Co’. In the 1930s the building was acquired by the Rank Group. Since then the building has stood empty for several decades. The Rank Group was founded by Joseph Rank in 1875 as a flour milling business and is still in existence today, now known as Rank Hovis McDougal (RHM). Incidentally, the equally famous J Arthur Rank film business was also started by a member of the same family.

My thanks to "Know Your London"for historic information

Help for Louise


Hi guys it’s a long shot but I’m looking for my grandad I have a very limited amount I know about him. His name is Sidney William Nicholls he lived at 23 Hyde street deptford in 1963&64 he lived with his dad who I believe is Sidney Nicholls (He was a lorry driver) & younger brother. I believe he would now be around 80 He was in to motorbikes and tattoos other than that I don’t know much 🙁

Saturday, 4 April 2020

Deptford Babies Hospital. Different view looking West towards the High St.





Leighs Story

Hi,

I was born in Deptford in 1957. Number 9 (I think) Walnut House, Edward Street. I have very vague memories of going to Edward St nursery school.
This next photo was taken by my brother, I have vivid memories of looking at him with his box brownie camera and Walnut house behind him. From this view, obviously taken on my birthday you can see they playground in front of Walnut house.
My family name was Morris, my first name was pretty unusual at the time, being Leigh. Perhaps someone remembers my family. My dad Joe was one of identical twins married to my mum, Joy.  I had an older brother Steve. I remember we used to go to the local baths (not swimming) but for taking a bath and doing your weekly wash, we obviously didn’t have a bathroom in our flat. It may have been in Evelyn Street. I remember a sweet shop just under some railway arches? and in another street nearby either a pet shop or a shop that had a minah bird in a cage outside that would talk to passers by. In those days your local doctor was a family one and would come and pay home visits. Ours was a Dr Conway, does anyone remember him ? On one occasion he was visiting to see my father (who was a steel-erector and had fallen through a roof damaging his back) when he saw that I was having a severe asthma attack. We had no home telephones in those days, so he had to run to the local call box to dial for an ambulance. One of many I’m afraid. I spent more time in Lewisham hospital than in school! The air pollution was pretty bad in those days often with thick “pea souper” smog. I do remember we also had a smallpox outbreak in London and everyone had to be vaccinated. I attach a copy of a photo of myself (aged around) 3Yrs I guess immediately taken after that. I am the first one. We don’t look too impressed do we ?






Wednesday, 4 March 2020

The Fountain, 36 Deptford Broadway, Deptford SE8







Thomas Randall and Sons in the back yard of the Old Fountain



How things change 

Deptford Green


The Peppercorn Brothers Deptford Broadway


Not quite sure where on the Broadway they were. Can anyone help with identifying 
their location Please. 


 This Pewter teapot was sold by them




Tuesday, 3 March 2020

Trying to find out about the Mantles & Gitshams from Mill Street

Dear Andy,


I have put a post up on the Carrington post, but didn't get any replies so hoping you could put a separate post for me to assist with my search for info. I have written the following that you could cut and paste into the post if that makes things easier'

I am a great granddaughter of Maria Mantle, whose parents Uriah and Sarah Gitsham, ran the Freemason's Arms, a pretty down and out alehouse in Mill St. The alehouse was eventually closed and buildings demolished and replaced by Carrington House.

In trying to trace the movements of the family after leaving the Mill St address, I haven't been able to find information. Maria eventually emigrated to Melbourne Australia but shipping records not clear in determining her arrival date. She gave birth to my grandfather in December 1899 out of wedlock. His birth certificate does not record a father's name. 

Maria's mother, Sarah Gitsham seems to have been a bit of a tough old chook, remarrying a Daniel Hone and having more children post Uriah. She also seems to have visited Melbourne at least once.

If anyone can help me out on my quest to learn more about the Gitshams and Mantles of the former Mill St I would greatly appreciate any information that you can provide.  

Thanks for putting this up on your website.
Kind regards
Simone

Friday, 21 February 2020

Photo on the Deptford Fund Hospital for Sick Babies


Babies Hospital located at 36, 38 Albury Street. Also could have been at number 34 as well.

Jeff Memories of Carrington House

HI Andy?,
 I was born in the old St. Alfages hospital in Greenwich in 1950.Apparently I was not thriving as I should as my Mum was terrified of the ward sister which caused problems with feeding me. My Dad decided to kidnap us both and we came home to the family residence at 39 St. Donatts Road, New Cross. I went to school at St. James's in the road of the same name, New Cross and later went to Addey and Stanhope grammar school (known by us as Study and No Hope) In New Cross Road Deptford. I well remember Carrington House and the forboding presence it cast over Brookmill Road and the surrounding area. When I was 15, I had a girlfriend who had a horse. She was so devoted to it that she turned up on it one day ....for a date at the pictures at the local fleapit (Deptfor Odeon). I told her that the place was pretty bad but didn't think they would let her and her horse in. As I recall a few of the local girls kept horses in the stables in Mechanics Passage where the totters kept theirs.
   In the 1070s, I started a long career driving buses and often drove the 47 past Carrington House and in the mid 1980s the 53 past the end of Brookmill Road. Looking back we seemed to enjoy our simple lifestyle and seemed a lot healthier for it.
  Thank you for all the lovely memories contained in your blog.
Jeff