Monday, 21 July 2014

Help for Giles in his search

Hello All,

Giles Gaffney has asked me to help him on his quest to find more information regarding the area around Lower Watergate and Butchers Row and in particular parts from a missing map. Here's his email to me and he would be grateful for any help.

Chris at Shipwrights can you help in anyway? As you can see Giles has been trying to contact you but like me he doesn't have you email. Thanks

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Dear Andy

I wanted to bring this to your attention - would also be grateful if you could please forward it to Shipwright's Palace as I don't have his email address or perhaps a plug on your website even - this is quite exciting stuff! :)

I am attempting to trace the source of this map (below) left by the Deptford Pier company upon demolition of the old village centre, which may span further south and east compared to the excerpt reproduced by Pre Construct in an archaeological report from 2008. It shows the numbering and position of all the buildings, including the names of the pubs/taverns, but is cropped before taking in Lower Watergate where another pub existed (below).

 
 
 
 

So far I have failed to trace it, but have begun contacting members of Pre Construct, so with any luck may hear back from them. The report in itself is worthy enough to appear on the same shelf, and alongside, the best history books of the Lewisham borough IMO!http://archaeologydataservice.ac.uk/archives/view/greylit/details.cfm?id=17970&det=y
 


 
 
Best regards
 
Giles 

Friday, 9 May 2014

Wednesday, 12 February 2014

Ghosts In Deptford by Cicely Fox Smith





Ghosts In Deptford


If ghosts should walk in Deptford, as very well they may,
A man might find the night there more stirring than the day,
Might meet a Russian Tsar there, or see in Spain's despite
Queen Bess ride down to Deptford to dub Sir Francis knight.

And loitering here and yonder, and jostling to and fro,
In every street and alley the sailor-folk would go,
All colours, creeds, and nations, in fashion old and new,
If ghosts should walk in Deptford, as like enough they do.

And there'd be some with pigtails, and some with buckled shoes,
And smocks and caps like pirates that sailors once did use,
And high sea-boots and oilskins and tarry dungaree,
And shoddy suits men sold them when they came fresh from sea.

And there'd be stout old skippers and mates of mighty hand,
And Chinks and swarthy Dagoes, and Yankees lean and tanned,
And many a hairy shellback burned black from Southern skies,
And brassbound young apprentice with boyhood's eager eyes,

And by the river reaches all silver to the moon
You'd hear the shipwrights' hammers beat out a phantom tune,
The caulkers' ghostly mallets rub-dub their faint tattoo —
If ghosts should walk in Deptford, as very like they do.

If ghosts should walk in Deptford, and ships return once more
To every well-known mooring and old familiar shore,
A sight it were to see there, of all fine sights there be,
The shadowy ships of Deptford come crowding in from sea.

Cog, carrack, buss and dromond — pink, pinnace, snake and snow —
Queer rigs of antique fashion that vanished long ago,
With tall and towering fo'c'sles and curving carven prows,
And gilded great poop lanterns, and scrolled and swelling bows.

The Baltic barque that foundered in last month’s North Sea gales,
And last year's lost Cape Horner on her sails,
Black tramp and stately liner should lie there side by side
Ay, all should berth together upon that silent tide.

In dock and pond and basin so close the keels should lie
Their hulls should hide the water, their masts make dark the sky,
And through their tangled rigging the netted stars should gleam
Like gold and silver fishes from some celestial stream.

And all their quivering royals and all their singing spars
Should send a ghostly music a-shivering to the stars —
A sound like Norway forests when wintry winds are high,
Or old dead seamen's shanties from great old days gone by, —

Till eastward over Limehouse, on river, dock and slum,
All shot with pearl and crimson the London dawn should come,
And fast at flash of sunrise, and swift at break of day,
The shadowy ships of Deptford should melt like mist away.






Cicely Fox Smith was born 1 February 1882, into a middle-class family in Lymm, near Warrington, England during the latter half of the reign of Queen Victoria. Her father was a barrister and her grandfather was a clergyman. Smith well might have been expected to have a brief education and then to settle down to life as a home-maker either for her family or her marriage partner.
She was well educated at Manchester High School for Girls from 1894 to 1897, where she described herself later as "something of a rebel," and started writing poems at a comparatively early age. In an article for the school magazine Smith later wrote "I have a hazy recollection of epic poems after Pope's Iliad, romantic poems after Marmion stored carefully away in tin tobacco boxes when I was seven or eight." All of that early work is lost unfortunately. She published her first book of verses when she was 17 and it received favourable press comments.
Wandering the moors near her home she developed a spirit of adventure. She would follow the Holcombe Harriers[disambiguation needed] hunt on foot as a girl. She had a fierce desire to travel to Africa but eventually settled for a voyage to Canada. Smith likely sailed with her sister Madge in 1911 on a steamship to Montreal, where she would then have travelled by train to Lethbridge, Alberta, staying for about a year with her older brother Richard Andrew Smith before continuing on to British Columbia (BC). From 1912 to 1913 she resided in the James Bay neighbourhood of Victoria at the southern tip of Vancouver Island, working as a typist for the BC Lands Department and later for an attorney on the waterfront. Her spare time was spent roaming nearby wharves and alleys, talking to residents and sailors alike. She listened to and learned from the sailors' tales until she too was able to speak with that authoritative nautical air that pervades her written work.
On 23 November 1913, Smith, with her mother and sister, arrived home in Liverpool aboard the White Star Line steamer Teutonic on the eve of World War I. She and her family then settled in Hampshire.
Poet[edit]

I'm Back

Hello 

Please let me apologise for the disruption and disappearance of "Old Deptford History" for the 3 weeks. I had domain/set-up issues but I'm happy to say this has now been sorted. Thanks for your patients and continued support whilst I've been off air!

very best regards to you all,

Andy

Wednesday, 13 November 2013

John Collins Chandler Shop



This chandle'r shop was located at No 53 Addey Street Deptford

Off License in Church Street Deptford






Does anyone know where this off license was located in Church Street??








Stowage 1904



This old photo of the Stowage also shows St Nicholas's Church just in view on the left and the Charnel House left/centre. 
A Charnel House is a vault or building where human skeletal remains are stored. They are often built near churches for depositing bones that are unearthed while digging graves The term can also be used more generally as a description of a place filled with death and destruction. The Charnel House was also known as the Watch House or Mortuary and was built soon after the rebuilding of the main part of the church at the end of the 17th C. At that time, bodies would be laid there for safekeeping. The building was restored in 1958.

Tuesday, 5 November 2013

London Gazette 4th November 1864

James Pearcey, of the Ship Defiance, Grove-street, Deptford, in the county of Kent, Licensed Victualler,"

Master Lumper and Stevedore, having been adjudged bankrupt under a Petition for adjudication of Bankruptcy, filed in Her Majesty's Court of Bankruptcy, in London, on the 10th day of October, 1864, a public sitting, for the said bankrupt to pass his Last Examination, and make application for his Discharge, will .be held before John Samuel Martin Fonblanque, Esq., a Commissioner of the said Court, on the 2nd day of December next, at the said Court, at Basinghall-street, in the city of London, at two o'clock in the afernoon precisely, the day last aforesaid being the day limited for the said bankrupt to surrender. Mr. Herbert Harris Cannan, of No. 36, Basinghall-street, is the Official Assignee, and Mr. W. W. Aldridge, of No. 46, Moorgate-street, is the Solicitor acting in the bankruptcy.

Sunday, 3 November 2013

Deptford, Grove Street Fire

London Fires in 1851.
 
Fires are continually occasioned by domestic animals, cats, dogs, rats, &c* The past year presented a novelty in the
 
Remarkable Discovery of a Fire by a Horse. — On Thursday, February 13th, about 1 a.m., intelligence was given at the fire- engine stations in London that a fire had broken out in Grove Street, Deptford, at the " Ship Defiance," public house. This fire was, however, promptly extinguished by the inmates and police. The messenger who gave the alarm at the West of England Fire-engine Station made a mistake, saying Globe Street. The engine was instantly horsed and started ; and Globe Street, Deptford, not being known to the firemen, they kept the high-road, trusting to the receipt of more precise and accurate information as they approached Deptford. Proceeding along at their usual rapid rate, they reached High Street, Deptford, when all of a sudden one of the engine-horses came to a dead stop, and refused to move a step further. Encouraging words and the whip were resorted to, but the only result was the horse's throwing himself on his haunches. Surprised at this extraordinary occurrence, curiosity was excited, when one of the firemen, addressing Mr. Connorton, the Superintendent, exclaimed — " Good God ! this house is on fire," pointing at the same time to the house opposite which the horse had so unaccountably stopped. The premises in question belonged to Mr. Wright, seedsman and corn-chandler, and on looking through the fanlight, the fire was found raging in the shop. The firemen instantly roused the neighbours ; and having collected a number of pails filled with water, they then broke open the shop door, and had nearly extinguished the fire before the policeman on the beat knew of the occurrence. 

Thursday, 26 September 2013

Mill Lane, 1903.


Mill Lane now Brookmill Road. Photograph taken from Deptford Broadway. The buildings on the right were originally lodging houses but were demolished in 1895 to make way for another lodging house, Carrington House.

Manning's Soup and Pie Shop 1904.


Manning's Pie & Soup House or 'The Old Pudden Shop' as it was also known was located at No. 147 Deptford High Street. Pay sixpence for the best meal in the world! It was demolished in 1907

Wednesday, 29 May 2013

At the Kings Head 1649


During my research I came across this token stamped Kings Head in Deptford. Its a 1/4p Traders Trading Token. Could this refer to the Kings Head Public House which was on the corner of Church Street and Albury Street ? Trade tokens were issued in the 17th century, between 1648 and 1673, in response to a lack of low denomination being produced by the crown. To ease the monetary situation, boroughs and cities across the country, began producing tokens to be used within the locality; in London the situation differed, due to the scale of the population, needed to issue private tokens, rather than one accepted city wide.
Tokens were issued by tradesmen for their business, and would also be accepted by other traders in the locality, as long as they knew the issuer and were assured that they would be able to redeem the value of the token. In a period when people often lived their entire lives within a relatively small area, this system would rely on the trust of the businesses in the neighbourhood. Tradesmen would keep a tray below their counter, where they would collect tokens from other issuers, and then redeem their collected value with the issuer.
Trade tokens were most commonly issued, as farthing, half penny, and penny denominations. Tokens were only issued as farthing tokens until 1656, when half penny tokens began to be brought in to circulation. With the silver half penny of the crown going out of use in 1661, this will have further increased the need for a half penny token, and it was at this time that it became a more common issue than the farthing. Penny tokens, were also issued by traders, most commonly by coffee-houses, the goods they sold being of a higher value than may be common elsewhere. There are also a small number of instances where higher denominations of coinage were issued, including tuppence and sixpence. 
A variety of information would be represented on the trade tokens; this could include, the place of issue, the issuers name, their trade, the denomination, with the denomination, the farthing often was not marked, it was recognisable by its smaller size, but the half penny and penny tokens often had the denomination written on them, in text or numerically. Most commonly featured, was a triad of initials representing those of the issuer, and their wife (or sometimes son). Read on the token from left to right and the up, the middle initial would be that of the wife.

Throughout the period of issue for the trade tokens, there were often plans by the Crown to produce farthings, it was only in 1672, that the first was finally issued. On the 16th August 1672, a proclamation was made by the crown, ordering the minting of trade tokens to cease, a further proclamation was issued in 1673, but it was only with the issue of a third proclamation in 1674, that the issue of trade tokens, finally ceased. By this time the use of trade tokens had once again, begun to fall, so the latest dates for tokens, are relatively rare.

Monday, 27 May 2013

The Parrish Family Lamerton Street


I recently made contact with a gentleman by the name of Roy Parrish. He sent me this brief insight of his younger life whilst living in Lamerton Street. His description of the house and living conditions mirrors exactly the recollection I have of my grandmothers house in Albury Street, particularly avoiding using the outside toilet especially after dark!  Roy say's........ 

"My grandfather lived there from the mid 20th century when the street was still a fairly new. The house where my grandfather and father lived was very dark inside, and to a very young boy like myself then in the 1950s a very creepy environment to live in. There was another family who lived in their house and they resided on the ground floor with our Parrish family of eight living on the floor above, so you can see they were very cramped conditions to live in. The High street end of Lamerton Street backed on to the old post office in Creek Road and the yard had the usual outside toilet which I always managed not to use!   As a point of interest I did my family tree some years back and was fortunate to do my whole family in one afternoon as all the records from St Alfege's church showed their family had been living in Deptford since the 18th century".



Roy has a number of stories which he can recall from over the years and when he has passed them on to  me I will post them.

Lamerton Street.

Tuesday, 21 May 2013





This old photo was sent to me by Trish Gage who was born in Deptford. It shows her grandad standing outside Borehams which was located in the High Street c1920's, I think.  It appeared on the TV documentary London's Secret Streets, Deptford High Street. My thanks to her for sharing this photo.

Andy

Wednesday, 3 April 2013

Sweet Shop in Church Street - 1940's - 50's

I believe this is the sweet shop just round the corner from Albury Street heading south to the Broadway.



After a bit of research the shop wasn't around the corner of Albury Street. It was in fact located by the Broadway as this sketch by Thankful Sturdey shows. Shops to the left were demolished in the 1940's


Wednesday, 27 March 2013

London & Brighton South Coast Railway



Can anyone recognise the road where this photo was taken. Could it be Grove Street?